Unimaginable trauma of Yazidi women is heightened by fragile psychosocial support

Unimaginable trauma of Yazidi women is heightened by fragile psychosocial support

By — January 20, 2017
In September 2016, when I arrived at a gloomy, two-star Econo Lodge hotel in Fort Lee, New Jersey, Daey*—which means “mother” in Kurdish—was sleeping. more »
In DRC, girls choose to become child soldiers to escape poverty

In DRC, girls choose to become child soldiers to escape poverty

By — January 6, 2017
Throughout the conflict in DRC, children have been abducted and made to serve as soldiers. While most are male, it is estimated over a third are female, used mainly as domestic and sexual servants, but sometimes as fighters. Now an NGO has released a report showing that many of the girls weren’t enlisted by force. They joined of their own free will—driven by poverty and a lack of access to education. more »
Trying to shut her up: Indigenous activist facing threats stands up for peace in Colombia

Trying to shut her up: Indigenous activist facing threats stands up for peace in Colombia

By — January 3, 2017
On April 20, Marcia Mejía Chirimia, 28, an indigenous Colombian peace and women’s rights activist, received a text message from someone she believes is a member of a paramilitary group. more »
For female detainees in Syria, life after prison can be even worse

For female detainees in Syria, life after prison can be even worse

By — December 22, 2016
When Luna Watfa refused to reveal any information to her interrogators, they took her son, 17, and threatened to torture him. “They put my son’s hands behind his back, his T-shirt over his head and they took him,” she says. more »
Rape is being used for ethnic cleansing in South Sudan. But it’s not the first place, or the last.

Rape is being used for ethnic cleansing in South Sudan. But it’s not the first place, or the last.

By — December 19, 2016
Wars fought because of ethnic hatred often seem to be more brutal than others. This is just a personal observation, having studied many. Just look at Rwanda, whose 1994 war saw between 250,000 and half a million women raped, often with objects and often publicly, in order to spread maximum humiliation and terror. more »
For women in humanitarian crises, contraception is vital

For women in humanitarian crises, contraception is vital

By — December 15, 2016
The recent Lancet Series on Maternal Health confirms a well-established reality: The majority of preventable maternal deaths continue to occur in areas affected by humanitarian crisis, largely as a result of poor maternal care. But this reminder is also accompanied by a chronic offense. Contraception is not given the spotlight it deserves. more »
Freeing Mosul could be a death sentence for Iraqi women: A Q&A with Yanar Mohammed

Freeing Mosul could be a death sentence for Iraqi women: A Q&A with Yanar Mohammed

By — December 7, 2016
In 2003, Yanar Mohammed decided she’d had enough. The war in Iraq was picking up steam, and she didn’t want to sit idly in Canada as her home country’s women and girls were being victimized in the turmoil. So, she packed up her bags and moved back to Baghdad to find a way to help. more »
The incredible challenge of convicting the first man for rape as a weapon of war

The incredible challenge of convicting the first man for rape as a weapon of war

By — November 30, 2016
Godeliève Mukasarasi promised God that if her children survived the Rwandan genocide of 1994, she would perform charitable acts. They lived. Soon after, the then 35-year-old social worker and mother founded SEVOTA, or Solidarity for the Development of Widows and Orphans to Promote Self-sufficiency and Livelihoods, a support group for women in the small Rwandan village of Taba. more »
Councilwoman urges ‘no fear’ for girls in post-IS Fallujah

Councilwoman urges ‘no fear’ for girls in post-IS Fallujah

By — November 22, 2016
Little girls returning to school in Fallujah “have nothing to fear,” said Nahla al-Rawi as a few security officers dusted off a chair for her in the partially rehabilitated main hospital. Al-Rawi, 48, is a member of the Anbar provincial council, which is tasked with inspecting and overseeing public facilities such as schools and hospitals. more »
Single mothers in Malawi struggle to feed families as famine spreads

Single mothers in Malawi struggle to feed families as famine spreads

By — November 17, 2016
Mary Elias, of Laje village in Malawi’s southern Zomba district, speaks in metaphors. “We are carrying both water cans,” she says of the situation for single mothers in drought-ridden Malawi—meaning that women with children but without partners are solely responsible for feeding, clothing, and educating their progeny. Already a Sisyphean task in a country the United Nations Development Program regularly ranks in the top 20 poorest on earth, this has become nearly impossible in the past few years. more »